Home > Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project > On Pottery and Plowzones

On Pottery and Plowzones

The plow (or plough as our British colleagues would say) is an inelegant tool for excavating, but nevertheless regularly produces interesting results.  The site of Pyla-Koutsopetria remains largely under cultivation (and we enjoy good relations with the farmers who lease their land from the British Ministry of Defense)so every year the plow brings up expected and sometimes exciting results. This past year a farmer put in some beautifully tilled and irrigated fields immediately adjacent to an area excavated in the mid 1990s by Maria Hadjicosti. 

Plough1
The hill of Vigla with the tilled fields

Around the edge of the field the farmer used a tool that looks like a giant hook.  He dragged around the base of a raised area that almost certainly represents a buried structure.

Plough2
The work of the hook

The results were impressive including sizable chunks of architectural gypsum that you can see in the photo below.  The white is roof tiles, plaster and mortar that was pulled up by the plow.

Ploughgypsum
Plows, Pottery, and Gypsum

Our entire site was tilled this past year pulling up a whole new range of material and the dry soil makes the pottery and plaster brought up over the past year particularly visible.  Part of our season goals will be to document some of this material.

For more on the Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project see our sister blogs: Pyla-Koutsopetria Graduate Student Weblog, Pyla-Koutsopetria Undergraduate Perspectives, and Pyla-Koutsopetria Season Staff Blog.

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  1. May 29, 2008 at 9:28 pm

    Very interesting. This sort of goes to support your theory that you can never survey too much, eh?

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